Archive

Posts Tagged ‘HR’

We’re hiring! Why every job isn’t fantastic.


If you happened to be scanning a jobs section and this popped up, would you give it a second thought?

Marketing assistant 
Dull and limited position demanding masses of isolated and unrewarding routine work and with no likely future prospects for candidates hugely unconcerned about success…show more

And even though it may not be your ‘thing’, how about this one?

Marketing executive
Exciting and varied role inviting masses of individual and rewarding research work and with infinite likely future prospects for candidates hugely passionate about succeeding…show more

See what we did there? It’s the same job!

Melbourne boring jobs

Management excluded: they rarely come in on Fridays

So it seems churlish even to have asked the question, doesn’t it.

Yet the first ‘extract’, above, is often the subtext for what many marketing jobs are really like and how they sometimes end up becoming.

So why is this? Why is it that every advertised job is, potentially, such a great opportunity? When, as we all know from experience, as VnN staffers will readily testify, reality can be rather different.

Enter, briefly, 44-year old Parisian Frédéric Desnard. As was reported in last week’s press, Frédéric didn’t think his job was that great. Not for four, depressing years in fact.

So Frédéric, as is the tendency in France among the disgruntled, took action direct. He decided to sue his company for boring him to (near) death. For over four years. He maintains no Read more…

Lovin’ it. A fashion for passion


Love and romance were in the air last week. Yesterday, Sunday 14th, saw its impassioned climax.

Handily topical times for band-wagoning agencies who are always proclaiming their own undying and dna-filled passion. For marketing, that is.

Hoping that this bedroom quality (or other preferred location) transitions to the boardroom. That it will stir prospective client partners – declared advocates of such attributes, themselves – to examine their credentials. And that they come up smelling of roses.

If we may so describe the act.

Image result for passionate worker

Career-advancing statement

So is passion-filled mid-February (2016) peak hook-up time? Are agency match-makers Read more…

What new business cold-calling can teach the PM


Handling hoax calls is not something the PM should be having to deal with. Ditto cold calls.

So we’re concerned but quietly confident that a wealth of expertise gained from new business cold calling at Views not News can help. Should it ever happen again, that is.

Here's an email I was sent...

Here’s an email I was sent…

It’s the NHS, our economy, immigration, Grexits, Ukraine, Saudi funerals, IS — not to mention a general election in 100 days’ time and how to get out of having demeaning telly debates with all sorts of undeserving class war upstarts — which should be matters of concern for the PM right now.

Perhaps add in the crisis of leading Premiership football clubs losing to lower division sides in the FA Cup, too. Black Swan things.

But defo not coked-up, drunken, probably workshy and boastful Sun readers having a laugh. Cheekily asking the PM if he’s awake when it’s 11am. Most likely trying to dig the dirt in an unguarded moment on what Dave really thinks of Nick. Actually, that’s not too difficult to work out.

But get used to it: digital has democratised everything. Even democracy.

So we’ve polled our hugely experienced cold-calling workers here at Views not News to get their personal views on how to handle cold-callers.  Asked poachers to become gamekeepers.

If you’re reading, David Cameron, GCHQ directors, we’ve summarised the many tips and experiences our dedicated staff have submitted.

Based on our extensive prospect calling history in a dramatically changed marketing world, at home and abroad, here’s our top three suggestions you can use now to avoid ever having to answer a cold / hoax call again: Read more…

Daimler man


Debbie Harvey@Debbie_FPCG

You know you’ve got it bad when you are away on holiday but you can’t help wondering if todays edition of @TheDrum has landed!

 

Well, I could actually. Not worry, that is, about whether “…todays edition…” (sic) had landed. Love The Drum though I do, Debbie, (and the new Retail Update, thanks) I’m a Daimler man now. Although I used to be a VW man. Here’s why:

British is best

Proper clockwork

Germans live by precision timing: two obvious examples of our clockwork-loving co-Europeans are football and cars.

2014 World Cup Winners speaks for itself. But it was back in 2011 that VW agreed not to send its BlackBerry (remember that?) equipped workers emails more than 30 minutes after they’d left work for the day. So as to avoid employee ‘burn-out’, the story went.

Senior management’s possible combustibility, however, was excluded. (PS: I know @TheDrum ain’t email.)

Daimler has now gone one step further. In case you missed it, last month Daimler gave its 100,000 plus workforce the opportunity to signal, mobile-y, when they went on hols. This meant any email which hit their inbox when they were hitting the beach would become the equivalent of toast post. ‘Auf wiedersehen’: the email was deleted.

Lucky German Daimler employees can now return from their hols chilled in the knowledge that email roadblocks no longer await.

“Our employees should relax on holiday and not read work-related emails,” said Wilfried Porth, board member for human resources. “With ‘Mail on Holiday’ they start back after the holidays with a clean desk. There is no traffic jam in their inbox. That is an emotional relief.”

Well said, Wilfried. Emotional relief is what we all deserve. ‘Male on Holiday’ would be even better for me! So good to see human resources claiming credit for something, don’t you think? How different HR must be in Germany! Read more…

Why great expectations for new business don’t work


Candidates like me are being looked for. I know this because LinkedIn regularly informs me so.

Not classified anymore

Not classified anymore

Another day, another clutch of emails (what is the right collective term for a wodge of emails hitting your inbox?) and LinkedIn is there, telling me…

Neil: The GIG at DST, Mindshare and Strategic-Move are looking for candidates like you.

Neil: Lis Welsh Search & Selection Ltd, Mindshare and Hays Specialist Recruitment are looking for candidates like you.

Now…do I (a) interrupt what I’m doing to click on these emails and waste my time looking at robot-generated job descriptions for amazingly multi-gifted people. Job descriptions which have only limited relationships to the real world. Or do I (b) just get on with what I’m doing – trying to make a real difference for the agencies I work with?

You guessed right: it’s (a) because I’m always too much of a sucker to resist. Hello time-management gurus: candidates like me are looking for help from you. FOMO therapists especially welcomed.

Publication of one’s own limitations might not be a sensible thing to do. But how many of us can resist the Read more…

Business development and the importance of not being yourself


We once pitched, and won, the business of a professional services firm – a law firm. The sector was a new experience to us with its own norms and values.

The lawyers passed a note round to each other when we were about three-quarters through our presentation. Distracting, but you know how it is…we carried on as if all this was just fine. Sensibly, we offered no lawyers’ jokes about professionals and sea-beds.

At each musical note stop, partners would nod, exchange a glance or two with their neighbour, scribble something on the note and pass it on. They all had a go until it finally got back to the note’s originator who checked the note and then held up his hand to stop us.

“OK”, he said. “You’ve got the business.” But what happened next was another new experience. Read more…

The long and the short of business development jobs


Sometimes, thanks to Gmail, Linked In and a few others, I click on “Jobs you may be interested in as Business Development Director” messages. I know I shouldn’t. But I do. Slippery slide now begins.

Quite honestly, I hate these little pop-up notifications. It’s not that I’m not interested — I am — but it’s just that I know that when I open the link I’ll get sucked into a vicious virtual vortex of ‘See Job Description’, ‘See other jobs like this’, ‘See how many people clicked on this link’ or ‘See all new jobs’.

Or something like this. So I waste an unforgivable amount of time ‘seeing’ and then see-sawing around. I do. The definition of madness means I must need therapy.

What makes it all so mind numbing is the complete and utter cruddiness of the information which such things as (a) the ‘Company Description’ and then (b) the Job Description itself are full of.

Company descriptions themselves tend to be stuffed full of hugely self-congratulatory jargon. Like this: Read more…